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Credit Scoring Works

Your credit score is a number that reflects on the likelihood at which you will pay back a loan. Scores range from 350 (high risk) to 950 (low risk). Credit scores do not take into consideration your income, how much savings you have or demographic factors such as gender, race or nationality. Your credit score is affected by your current debt level, your past delinquencies, your credit history and how many times your credit report is pulled up by various agencies. Your score considers both positive and negative information in your credit report. For instance, recorded late payments will lower your credit score while a good track record of making payments on time will raise your credit score. Timely payment of your bills is important to ensure you maintain a good credit score. The amount of balance you have left on your credit card, how many credit card accounts you hold and your use of revolving credit also affect your credit score to a great extent.

Your credit score and credit report is formed on the basis of your credit history and you need to have at least one account which has been open or updated in the past six months to get a credit score. If you do not meet the minimum criteria for getting a score, you may need to establish a credit history prior to applying for a mortgage.

All in all, if you can pay for all your debts in a timely and consistent manner and not take more debt than you can handle, your credit score shouldn’t be able to trouble you in life. So take care and be wise with your finances.